Wharncliffe

What a scorcher! I’ve spent the day so far sweltering under the blazing sun in the Wharncliffe area, in the hope of mopping up a couple of birds that have escaped me so far this Spring… spotted flycatcher and wood warbler.

Not long after I entered the woods, the cuckoos could be heard in fine song, and it wasn’t long until I managed to find the source of the noise and get fantastic views of a bird as it moved between perches in a clearing, staying around long enough and at close enough range for a semi-decent photo.

Cuckoo

Sadly my targets remained elusive, but there were plenty of garden warblers, blackcaps and a couple of tree pipits to keep me amused, as well as a smattering of butterflies including a good few painted ladies.

I walked up to Wharncliffe Chase, in the hopes of a spotted fly along the edges, again with no joy,  but did get good views of a handsome redstart near Wharncliffe Lodge, which you can just about make out in the photo below (if you squint a bit…).

Redstart

Other birds around included more tree pipits, and a singing yellowhammer. A walk through the Heath wasn’t very productive (bar the usual green tiger beetles), but walking back to the woods on the path beneath the crags finally yielded a singing wood warbler, which was tracked down and gave some brief views as it moved through the branches. Nearby I also saw a great spotted woodpecker feeding some noisy chicks in a nest hole.

Sadly the spotted flycatcher remained elusive – hopefully I’ll get one soon!

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Pete

My name is Pete

3 thoughts on “Wharncliffe”

  1. Hi, Pete
    I was also out and about at Wharncliffe today! Walked from Oughtibridge to Wortley Station. Mustn’t have been too far away. Also heard cuckoos and saw woodpeckers but don’t have your skills to track them down to photograph! Only manages a female chaffinch. Lots of butterflies but weren’t they fast! Also saw lots of painted ladies, some orange tips, speckled woods small tortoiseshell and a waves moth. Managed 2 fungi – Coprinus micaceus and Lycogala epidendrum (pink slime mold).
    Chris

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